JUNE 2018 HEALTH NEWS ROUND UP

June just came to an end, here are some updates from the health world. Enjoy June 2018 health news round up.

  • A ROBOT OPERATED ON A HUMAN EYE FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER

From gallbladder procedures to prostate surgery, robots are already mainstays in the operating room. Now, they’re coming for your eyes.

Researchers at the University of Oxford in the U.K., working with Dutch medical robotics firm Preceye, have developed a robot that can perform eye surgery on humans.

The team used the robot to help six participants who needed a membrane removed from their retina to improve their vision. The procedure involves excising a collection of cells that have clumped together.

The robot has a moveable arm directed using a joystick-style controller; it can be fitted with various surgical instruments, and filters out tremors from the surgeon’s hand.

Twelve participants received the surgery, with six being worked on by the robot, and six receiving treatment from a human surgeon; all the operations were deemed successful.

Although the robotic approach took nearly three times as long as performing the surgery manually, the researchers attribute this to the fact that the surgeons were new to using the robot and were being cautious.

Would you let a Robot operate on your eyes?

  • FIRST CANNABIS-BASED DRUG APPROVED FOR USE ON PATIENTS WITH EPILEPSY IN US

A treatment for childhood epilepsy developed by a UK firm has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and will become the first cannabis-based medicine on the American market.

The drug Epidiolex, made by GW Pharmaceuticals was approved on the 25th of june for the treatment of two rare but severe forms of childhood epilepsy: Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

The active ingredient in the drug is cannabidiol, and it contains only a trace of the psychoactive component of cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC.

In clinical trials, Epidiolex proved effective at helping people with these conditions control their seizures.

“This approval serves as a reminder that advancing sound development programs that properly evaluate active ingredients contained in marijuana can lead to important medical therapies,” said Scott Gottlieb, FDA commissioner.

But he warned that the organization would continue to punish illegal marketing of cannabidiol-containing products with unproven medical claims.

The UK government announced a review into the possible use of marijuana-based medical products, in the wake of much public debate over the use of cannabis oil to treat epilepsy.

The company is also developing cannabis-based treatments for epilepsy, schizophrenia and glioblastoma, a form of brain cancer for which there are no reliable treatments.

www.newscientist.com/article/2172683-first-cannabis-based-drug-approved-in-the-us-to-treat-epilepsy/

  • WOMAN’S UNEXPLAINED WEIGHT GAIN TURNED OUT TO BE A 50-POUND OVARIAN TUMOR

An Alabama woman finally has some answers after struggling for months with pain, stomach issues, and weight gain. The cause? A 50-pound ovarian tumor.

The 30-year-old woman, Kayla Rahn, had experienced stomach pain and weight gain for months, and even had trouble with everyday activities like walking,  “I couldn’t even walk to my car without losing my breath,” Rahn told WSFA a TV station.

Doctors told Rahn she simply needed to loose weight, but despite her weight-loss efforts, she continued to put on pounds.

Kayla’s pain got so bad, she ended up in the emergency room, where doctors finally identified the problem: a 50-lb. (23 kilograms) mass on one of her ovaries.

Rahn had a type of tumor known as a mucinous cystadenoma, according to WSFA. This type of tumor is benign and arises from the tissue that forms the outer layer of the ovary, called the epithelium, according to a 2010 report of a similar case in Saudi Arabia. Mucinous cystadenoma tumors account for about 15 percent of all ovarian tumors.

Rahn’s physician, Dr. Gregory Jones, an obstetrician/gynecologist at Jackson Hospital in Montgomery, Alabama, said he has seen cases of mucinous cystadenoma before, but he was surprised by the size of Rahn’s tumor. “This is one of the largest I have ever seen or certainly removed,” Jones told WSFA.

Rahn underwent surgery to remove the tumor last month, and she is now recovering. She’s now able to wear clothes that she couldn’t fit into before. “This dress I have on, I actually have not been able to wear in a year,” Rahn said.

Rahn says she hopes her story will encourage others to seek medical help when something doesn’t seem right.

https://www.livescience.com/62957-womans-50-pound-ovarian-tumor.html

  • PLASTER WHICH STICKS INSIDE THE MOUTH WILL REVOLUTIONIZE TREATMENT OF ORAL CONDITIONS

Researchers from the University of Sheffield’s School of Clinical Dentistry, working in a close coordinated effort with Dermtreat A/S from Copenhagen, have built up an interesting patch utilizing uncommon polymers which can stick to wet surfaces.

The patch effectively regulates steroids specifically to oral ulcers or lesions while additionally making a protective barrier around the influenced zone, quickening the healing procedure.

The biodegradable Rivelin patch has a long adhesion time and a high flexibility which conforms to the surface inside the mouth.

Dr. Craig Murdoch, Reader in Oral Bioscience School of Clinical Dentistry and lead author of the research, said: “Chronic inflammatory conditions such as OLP and RAS, which cause erosive and painful oral lesions, have a considerable impact on quality of life.

“Current treatments consist of using steroids in the form of mouthwashes, creams or ointments, but these are often ineffective due to inadequate drug contact times with the lesion.

“The patch acts like a plaster inside your mouth, which means it is very effective at directly targeting the specific area as well as forming a protective barrier.

“Patients who have trialed the patch found it to be very comfortable to wear and they were really pleased with the length of adhesion which makes it particularly effective and efficient.”

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180625122449.htm

  • LITTLE GIRL TEMPORARILY PARALYZED AFTER TICK BITE

A five-year-old girl from Mississippi woke up one morning in June and couldn’t walk. The reason? A tick bite.

The girl’s mother, Jessica Griffin, first noticed something was wrong on the said day (June 6), when her daughter Kailyn had trouble getting up to go to daycare.

“As soon as her feet hit the floor, she fell,” Griffin told a local news outlet “She would try to stand and walk but would continue to fall.”

 

At first, Griffin thought her daughter’s legs were just asleep. But while brushing Kailyn’s hair, Griffin found a tick in her daughter’s scalp. Griffin removed the tick and took her daughter to the emergency room, where she was diagnosed with tick paralysis.

Tick paralysis is a rare disease that’s thought to be caused by a toxin in tick saliva, according to a 2006 report on the condition from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Symptoms usually appear about four to seven days after a tick bites a person, and typically go away within 24 hours of tick removal, the CDC said. These symptoms can include an unsteady gait, muscle weakness and eventually, breathing difficulties, according to the National Institutes.

Your Health attitude hopes you find our health news round up informative. Do share this posts with your friends and family.

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